All About Estates

Category: Spouse

Total 43 Posts

Of Love, Resulting Trusts, Matrimonial Homes and Fenlon Falls

The gratuitous transfer of property from a parent to an adult, capable child may result in a resulting trust.

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Constructive Trust and Proprietary Estoppel – Built With Your Own Hands

Families often fall into patterns and routines; they are comfortable, stable, and predictable. They can also give rise to legal rights over land. The extent and enforceability of those rights will be put to the test following death or divorce. Such was the case in Tomek v Zabukovec, 2020 ONSC…

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Low- Interest Environment: Time To Take Advantage Again.

In past blogs, we discussed income splitting arrangements available to individuals who wish to loan funds to his/her lower income spouse or adult child, or in the case of minor children, a discretionary family trust. Such loans would be used to invest in income producing properties such as marketable securities,…

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Home Buyer’s Plan and Disabled Family Member

In a recent blog, I wrote about the availability of Home Buyer’s Plan (HBP) to an individual after the death of her spouse who purchased the matrimonial home. In a recent Technical Interpretation (2019-0819671E5, D. Odubella), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) was asked by a taxpayer to review the availability…

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Actions Have Consequences – They May Sever Joint Tenancy

Leaving aside other means of severance, including that which occurs on bankruptcy or by judicial sale, there are three main ways to sever a joint tenancy: Unilaterally acting on one’s own share, such as selling or encumbering it; A mutual agreement between the co-owners to sever the joint tenancy; and…

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Clash of the Limitation Periods

The Limitations Act, 2002, SO 2002, c 24, Sch B, brought order and clarity to limitation periods in Ontario. However, the Limitations Act did not displace all existing limitation periods established by statute. The Limitations Act carves out several exceptions, including the Real Property Limitations Act, RSO 1990, c L.15…

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When is a Dividend Not a Dividend?

In Trower v. the Queen, 2019 TCC 77, the Company was privately held by the taxpayer and her spouse (49% and 51% respectively) until the taxpayer ceased to be shareholder in the Fall of 2016, pursuant to a separation agreement between the spouses. The company prepared and filed a T5…

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“Death be not proud, though some have called thee mighty and dreadful, for thou are not so…” – John Donne

It is never easy when a loved one dies. Only adding to one’s grief is the fact that the administrative tasks to deal with a death can be complicated. There is any number of loose-ends to address and specific steps to take to bring finality to a life well-lived.

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Trustee’s Personal Liability – It Could Go on for Years!

Take the case of Estate of Ronald Alfred Craymer v Hayward et al, 2019 ONSC 4600, The Craymers were married in the 1980’s. It was a second marriage for Mrs. Craymer and a fourth marriage for Mr. Craymer. At the time of their marriage, Mrs. Craymer had three adult children…

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When Spouses “Separate” Due to Changing Medical Needs

This blog was written by Christina Papadopoulos, student-at-law at de VRIES LITIGATION LLP. How does a physical separation caused by the admission of one spouse into a long-term care facility impact the interpretation of a will? This was the question posed to the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Stuart…

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