All About Estates

Emily Hubling

Total 22 Posts Website
Emily Hubling is an associate in the Trusts, Wills, Estates and Charities group at Fasken. Emily has experience in advising estate trustees in administering a range of complex estate matters, including intestacies, cross-border matters, and contested estates. Working closely with clients’ advisors, Emily prepares Wills, Powers of Attorney, and Trusts to assist clients in fulfilling their unique estate-planning objectives.

Bill 245 and Changes to the Succession Law Reform Act

On February 5, 2021, I wrote a blog on Section 16(b) of the Succession Law Reform Act. Now, almost three months later, Ontario’s Bill 245 has received royal assent. Among many other changes to various pieces of legislation, Bill 245 revokes section 16 of the Succession Law Reform Act (the…

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Reflections before the Budget

On April 19th, the federal government will table its first budget in two years. This budget comes in the middle of Canada’s third wave of COVID-19 and is set to address the pandemic’s resulting economic challenges. Practitioners can likely expect, if they are not receiving them already, calls from clients…

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Section 16(b) of the Succession Law Reform Act: A Different Kind of Spousal Election

In Ontario, s. 15 of the Succession Law Reform Act (the “SLRA”) provides that a Will is revoked by a subsequent marriage of the testator. Practitioners who are meeting with a client in the weeks leading up to his or her marriage will often prepare a Will that contains a…

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Secret and Semi-Secret Trusts: An Unusual Approach to Testamentary Dispositions – Part II

Guest written by Giancarlo Mignardi, Student-at-Law at Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP Last week, I provided an overview of secret and semi-secret trusts, as well as the legal framework that allows for their existence. Today, I will discuss some of the practical uses of such trusts in modern estate-planning, as well…

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The Upcoming Federal Election: Changes that Could Affect the Advice Provided by Estate Planners

On Monday, October 21st, Canadians will go to the polls to elect the federal government. While the major parties’ platforms address many issues that are important to Canadians, there are several that will, in particular, impact the personal finances of Canadians and, ultimately, the advice provided by estate planners:[1] Personal…

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Difference Between a POA and an SDM

Written by Fatima Husnain, student-at-law at Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP Prior to law school, I worked in a hospital inpatient mental health unit. Many of the patients were unable to make their own health care decisions and relied upon other individuals to make decisions on their behalf. If anyone had…

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R.E.S.P.E.C.T…..the handwriting analysis?

The Aretha Franklin estate saga has taken another interesting turn this week, with a Michigan Probate Court making an order for a handwriting analyst to review one of her holograph Wills. As Lara Besharat explained in her detailed blog post on May 23rd, Aretha died in August of 2018, leaving…

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“Just in case anything happens while I’m away…”

It’s that time of year again for estate planners: the season of calls from clients about to leave for vacation, who realize that they haven’t updated their Will in years. These clients typically want to make sure they update their documents before departure, “just in case anything happens while I’m…

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When is “old enough”? Choosing an age for estate distributions

I often meet with clients who wish to have Wills prepared which provide for trusts for their children. After explaining the nature of a testamentary trust to the clients, I typically recommend that they select a set age that the child is to receive the capital (or the remainder thereof)…

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Budget 2019: A Change to the Estate Administration Tax

On April 11th, 2019, Ontario’s Ford government released its first budget. Of note to estates practitioners, as of January 1, 2020, Estate Administration Tax (commonly referred to as “probate fees”) will not be payable on the first $50,000.00 of an estate’s value. Currently, probate fees are levied at a rate…

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