All About Estates

Category: Estate Litigation

Total 306 Posts

Capacity to Retain and Instruct Counsel

Estate litigation cases often impact upon persons who are incapable. In particular, an individual may be incapable of, among other things, managing their property or personal care, of making a will (testamentary capacity) and of retaining and/or instructing counsel. The recent case of Guardian Law Group v. LS, 2021 (“Guardian”)…

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Disclosure of a Party’s Medical Records

In will challenges, it is common to seek the disclosure of the testator’s medical records for the period around the time the will was signed. The medical records are directly relevant to the question of whether or not she had the requisite capacity to sign the will. While the testator…

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TIPS ON BRINGING A PASSING OF ACCOUNTS APPLICATION – PART 5 (FINAL THOUGHTS)

Today’s blog will wrap up my series of blogs related to bringing an application to pass accounts (the “Passing Application”).[1]  We will look at how an Executor/Trustee completes the Passing Application and obtains a judgment on passing of accounts. A Passing Application will either proceed without a court hearing, if…

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Increase In House Value Means $1.4 million Gift to SPCA

For many people who own the house in which they live, their home is the most valuable asset in their estate. In many communities in Canada, house values have steadily increased over the last several years and particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. This means that the value of an estate…

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The Court of Appeal Considers if an Application for Retroactive Support can be brought against an Estate

In Blacklock v. Tkacz, the Ontario Court of Appeal confirmed that pursuant to section 17 of the Divorce Act, an application cannot be brought to claim or vary a child support order against a deceased’s payor’s estate if the original support order does not explicitly bind the payor’s estate. The Appellant…

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When Is A Signature Not A Signature?

Under the Succession Law Reform Act (SLRA), a will or codicil must be “signed” to be valid. The case of BMO Trust Company v. Cosgrove, 2021 ONSC 5681 considered what handwritten form of a person’s name constituted a signature. Nola Louise Bogie hired a lawyer to prepare her will. However,…

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To Fight at Any Cost

Lawsuits often put litigants on an emotional rollercoaster. As the lawsuit progresses and legal bills pile up, some clients start caring less about strategy and more about causing maximum pain to the other side. However, abandoning reason and moderation has a cost – usually in the form of a cost…

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300 Objections. 3 Week Hearing. $325,000 Costs Award.

Those who practice in the world of estates know that emotions can run high. Estate planning and estate litigation involve relationships and, often, family. And relationships and family are complicated. It can sometimes be hard to be reasonable in the face of difficult emotions. But reasonableness should be a guiding…

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Reaffirming the Status Quo of Beneficial Designations: the saga of Calmusky v. Calmusky continued

The Rippling Effects of Calmusky v. Calmusky In March of 2020, Lococo J.’s decision in Calmusky v. Calmusky made waves in Ontario’s legal community. (For this reason, it was included in our top 20 estate law cases of 2020. An excellent summary and analysis of that decision by my colleague…

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“If You See Something, Say Something”*

Do you have a ‘TCP’? While I am not a fan of using acronyms, ‘TCP’I is one you want to know.  It is shortform for ‘Trusted Contact Person’. “The Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) announced July 15 that regulators are adopting amendments to National Instrument 31-103 Registration Requirements, Exemptions and Ongoing Registrant Obligations, which…

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