All About Estates

Joanna Lindenberg

Total 10 Posts
Joanna is an experienced estates, trusts, and capacity litigator at de VRIES LITIGATION LLP. Joanna obtained her law degree from the Shulich School of Law at Dalhousie University after completing a Bachelor of Arts degree at McGill University. Following her call to the Ontario Bar in June 2011, Joanna obtained a Masters of Law at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), specializing in international and comparative law. Joanna's current practice focuses on, in part, will challenges, dependant’s support, capacity, and power of attorney disputes.

Sham(e) on You!

McGoey (Re), 2019 ONSC 80 (CanLII) is a fun case which reminds readers of the law surrounding sham trusts, but also demonstrates that the most convincing evidence can sometimes be found right on the (type)face of a document, the validity of which is in issue. In this motion, the trustee…

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Milne Estate (Re)visited

Today’s blog was co-authored by Joanna Lindenberg and Ronald Neal The decision of Milne Estate (Re) (“Milne”) caused a stir among the members of the estates bar and solicitors who draft wills, going so far as to illicit an alert from LawPRO. While the Milne decision (which is under appeal)…

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Preservation Orders in Estate Litigation

Estate litigators are very familiar with unique and interesting fact patterns and it is helpful to be reminded that unusual circumstances may warrant the use of somewhat uncommon remedies. Rule 45 of the Rules of Civil Procedure is one such remedy, which provides for the interim preservation of property and…

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A Brief Review of Solicitor’s Negligence

Claims against solicitors for negligence often arise in the context of estates cases, whether it be the failure of a lawyer to ensure that a testator’s wishes are accurately reflected in his/her will, to neglecting to confirm the testator had the requisite capacity and was not subject to undue influence…

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My Best Interests, and Yours Too?

The recent case of Tarantino v. Galvano, 2017 ONSC 3535, raises a variety of issues familiar to estate litigators – powers of attorney, capacity, quantum meruit claims, the duty to account and the rules surrounding the removal of an estate’s executor. In this case the deceased, Rosa Filippo Galvano (“Rosa”) had…

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You Shall be Released

A recent Ontario Court of Appeal (“ONCA”) decision, though not an estate case specifically, is an important read for all litigators and parties who settle their disputes outside of the courtroom. In the case of Biancaniello v. DMCT LLP, 2017 ONCA 386 (CanLII), the parties signed a mutual release to…

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Limited Retainers, Lawyer Liability and Limitation Periods

The recent Court of Appeal (“ONCA”) decision of Meehan v. Good, 2017 ONCA 103 (“Meehan”), reminds lawyers that the duty of care owed to their clients is extensive, and may operate beyond a limited-scope retainer. In Meehan, the plaintiffs, Michael and Anne Meehan, brought a claim against their lawyer, John…

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Dismal Results for Dreadful Estate Trustee

A recent case of the Ontario Superior Court (Silva et. al v. Silva (Estate of)) demonstrates the wide remedies available to beneficiaries whose interests have been prejudiced by the misconduct of an estate trustee. Jose Lima Silva died without a will on June 24, 2015. He was survived by 5…

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Who Needs Tickets?

Who gets the Leaf tickets? This was the question the court had to determine in the recent case of Anspor Construction Ltd. v. Neuberger Estate (Trustee of)[1]. In this case, the court provided a good summary of the requirements to establish a bare trust and a purchase money resulting trust…

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Robots are Judging You

The legal test for testamentary capacity is well-established in Ontario. In making a determination of whether or not an individual had the capacity to make a will, the evidence of a certified capacity assessor is often given great deal of weight. However, scientific developments have led to a new type of assessor of a person’s…

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