All About Estates

Category: Capacity Law

Total 92 Posts

Evaluation of Decision Making Capacity: Aiming for an Improved Standard of Care

Evaluation of decision-making capacity is inherent to the practice of law and medicine and is not the exclusive responsibility or expertise of either. Lawyers may need to assess (among other things) capacity to instruct counsel; to provide evidence; to stand trial; to appoint or revoke Powers of Attorney; to make…

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Third Party Appeals of Healthcare Decisions

As reported in the media[i] [ii] [iii], Nova Scotia’s appeals court recently heard a case involving a woman who is trying to stop her husband from receiving medical assistance in dying (MAiD). The woman is appealing a lower court decision that rejected her request for an interlocutory injunction against her…

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Road Testing your Incapacity Plan

This Blog was written by Suzanna Walter, Estate and Trust Consultant with Scotia Wealth Management In Ontario, there is a massive backlog of appointments for driving tests due to the shutdown of DriveTest Centres.  This led me to quickly check the expiry date of my own Driver’s License, which quickly…

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Diminishing Capacity and Urge to Delay

This blog was written by Paula Lester – Estate and Trust Consultant with Scotia Wealth Management As an Estate and Trust Consultant who works closely with financial advisors and their clients, I find myself being asked increasingly often to help clients whose capacity has become a concern. This seems to…

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Guardian of Personal Care: Step Up or Step Out

While the courts will defer to the wishes of the incapable person regarding their attorney/guardian of personal care, they will also look at the past actions of the applicants.

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Delusions and Capacity

 This Blog was written by Emily Racine, Estate and Trust Consultant with Scotia Wealth Management We all know how important it is to have a valid will. Part of that validity stems from ensuring that the testator was capable and of sound mind when he or she signed the will. …

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No Passing of Accounts Unless “Significant Concern”

Emerson and Marie Lewis appointed two of their six adult children, Donald and Douglas Lewis, as their attorneys for property. Their remaining four children (the “non-attorney siblings”) commenced an application pursuant to ss. 42(1) and (4) of the Substitute Decisions Act, 1992, S.O. 1992, c.30 (the “SDA”) for leave to…

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Forensic Profile of Perpetrators of Financial Elder Abuse

Financial elder abuse is defined by the World Health Organisation as the illegal or improper exploitation or use of funds or resources of the older person.[i] The misuse of a senior’s funds and assets involves the use of the senior’s funds without that senior’s knowledge and/or full consent, or, in…

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Concerns about Consent for Cannabis Prescriptions in LTC

Last month I wrote about the issue of consent for CPR, explaining that the Court in Wawrzyniak v. Livingstone confirmed that a physician’s duty is to his or her patient and not the interests of the substitute decision-maker (SDM). Treatments that are not believed to be in the interests of…

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Can You be Removed as a Trustee Without a Replacement?

The recent case of Novak v. McDougall, (2019 SKQB 261), confirms that when you have accepted an appointment to be trustee, you may not be able to have yourself removed from that appointment without a suitable replacement. The applicant in this case, a beneficiary of a “Henson” trust (basically defined…

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