All About Estates

Category: Powers Of Attorney and Guardianship Disputes

Total 55 Posts

Dementia, Health Law and Discharge Planning Challenges

A clinical dilemma: a patient was diagnosed with dementia in the mild-to-moderate stage requested to be discharged home from hospital to live alone despite the opinion of the attorney for personal care and property that the patient is unsafe to do so. The clinical opinion was also that the patient…

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The Importance of Fiduciary Duties

The Oxford Dictionary defines a fiduciary as a person in a position of trust, especially when it involves controlling money or property belonging to others. The law places particular emphasis on the trust relationship between a trustee and a third-party beneficiary. Among other duties, a fiduciary is required to: (1)…

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No Costs For You!

The recent case of Donovan v. MacKenzie, 2021 ONSC 1865 (CanLII) demonstrates the wide and sometimes unpredictable nature of a judge’s discretion when it comes to costs. In this guardianship dispute, the applicant sister (“Jacqueline”) and the respondent brother (“Kieran”) were embroiled in litigation relating to their father, John Kenneth…

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The Role of the PGT – When, Why and How?

While estate lawyers are often presented with files that impact upon the rights of an incapable person, it is important to understand when, why and how the Public Guardian and Trustee (the “PGT”) becomes involved with such disputes. As noted on its website, and in general, the PGT acts as…

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Audio Recordings in a Guardianship Application; Think Twice Before Pressing Record

In the recent guardianship case, Rudin-Brown v. Brown, the court considered whether to admit into evidence recordings made of an incapable adult’s telephone conversations. Carolyn was found to be incapable in 2018.  In 2016, Carolyn signed new power of attorney documents for personal care and property (“2016 Powers of Attorney”)…

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Suggestions to Reduce the Potential for Elder Financial Abuse

I suggest that improved screening for vulnerability to abuse is clearly needed for seniors appointing family members as attorneys for property.

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Evaluation of Decision Making Capacity: Aiming for an Improved Standard of Care

Evaluation of decision-making capacity is inherent to the practice of law and medicine and is not the exclusive responsibility or expertise of either. Lawyers may need to assess (among other things) capacity to instruct counsel; to provide evidence; to stand trial; to appoint or revoke Powers of Attorney; to make…

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Endowment Variations

COVID-19 has hit the charitable sector hard, and arts organizations face particular challenges. A recent article in The Globe and Mail about the Banff Centre described closed facilities, lost fundraising, cancelled programs, layoffs, deficits, resignations, and protests. The article also mentioned a request to endowment donors for “permission” to use…

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Can Section 3 Counsel be Summoned for Examination?

Successfully summoning counsel of record for examination is typically a difficult task, and a motion to quash will often be brought after a summons is served on counsel for one of the parties. Case law in is clear that, generally, calling a lawyer to give evidence against their client should…

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Who Can Be a Litigation Guardian?

A recent decision by Master Kaufman examines whether a person with a personal interest in the legal proceedings can act as a litigation guardian for a party under a disability. In Shady Saleh v. Mohammed Salehe, the plaintiff, Shady, was his mother’s power of attorney for property. He sought to…

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