All About Estates

Category: Estate Litigation

Total 243 Posts

Actions Have Consequences – They May Sever Joint Tenancy

Leaving aside other means of severance, including that which occurs on bankruptcy or by judicial sale, there are three main ways to sever a joint tenancy: Unilaterally acting on one’s own share, such as selling or encumbering it; A mutual agreement between the co-owners to sever the joint tenancy; and…

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Clearance Certificates

An executor, as the legal representative of the estate, is required to obtain a clearance certificate before distributing property that they control. Where the executor fails to obtain a clearance certificate, they are liable for any unpaid amounts in respect of any property distributed. Some will argue that not every…

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Estates Law and Privacy Law: An Incomplete Intersection (Part II)

This is the second entry in a three-part blog series about the current state of estates law vis-à-vis privacy law. Part I focused on the relevant federal and provincial privacy legislation. Part II will examine significant court decisions relating to this area. Part III will look at solutions for lawyers…

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Hidden Fees – A Breach of Trust

Registered accounts are often set up as express trust accounts, with the bank acting as trustee and the account holder as beneficiary. In these cases, banks are subject to all the same fiduciary duties and responsibilities that apply to all trustees – meaning they cannot charge hidden fees.

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Forensic Profile of Perpetrators of Financial Elder Abuse

Financial elder abuse is defined by the World Health Organisation as the illegal or improper exploitation or use of funds or resources of the older person.[i] The misuse of a senior’s funds and assets involves the use of the senior’s funds without that senior’s knowledge and/or full consent, or, in…

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Clash of the Limitation Periods

The Limitations Act, 2002, SO 2002, c 24, Sch B, brought order and clarity to limitation periods in Ontario. However, the Limitations Act did not displace all existing limitation periods established by statute. The Limitations Act carves out several exceptions, including the Real Property Limitations Act, RSO 1990, c L.15…

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Revocation of Wills

In the recent case of Sokalski Estate (Re), 2019 ABQB 285, the deceased left two wills one in 2011 and the other 2017, without expressly revoking the earlier one. The estate applied to the Court for a determination regarding which document or documents form the deceased Mr. Sokalski’s last will….

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Estates Law and Privacy Law: An Incomplete Intersection (Part I)

Estates Law and Privacy Law: An Incomplete Intersection (Part I) This is the first entry in a three-part blog series about the current state of estates law vis-à-vis privacy law. Part I will focus on the relevant federal and provincial privacy legislation. Part II will examine significant court decisions relating…

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Yet Another Family Cottage Feud

In summertime cottages are the delight of everyone. But that dreamy cottage can turn into an estate litigation nightmare, as one family discovered in Donaldson v. Braybrook, 2020 ONCA 66. Margaret had four children: Wendy, Susan, Thomas and Barry. She allowed them all generous access to her cottage. In fact,…

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Criminals Cannot Profit From Their Crimes – Or Can They?

Criminals cannot profit from their crimes – unless they are not criminally responsible.

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