All About Estates

Category: Wills

Total 151 Posts

Court of Appeal Weighs In On Alcoholism and Testamentary Capacity

In the recent decision of Dujardin v. Dujardin, 2018 ONCA 597, the Court of Appeal for Ontario considered the validity of wills executed by a testator suffering from chronic alcoholism. Background: Jack and Noel Dujardin (“Jack” and “Noel”) were brothers who jointly owned a farm property that had been in…

Continue Reading

Where There’s a Will Kit, Is There’s a Will?

This blog is contributed by Sally Lee LLB,  an Estate & Trust Consultant at Scotiatrust. I once got into a heated argument with my sister who wanted me to validate her decision to make a Will with  a Will Kit.  I vehemently opposed, and we did not speak for about a…

Continue Reading

Graduated rate estate – don’t lose it!

A graduated rate estate (GRE) is an estate that arises as the result of the death of a person on or after December 31, 2015, and no more than 36 months after the person’s death. The estate at that time must be a testamentary trust. The GRE designation brings with key…

Continue Reading

The Risk and (Potential) Reward for Acting as an Executor [1]

  For those engaged in thoughtful Will planning there comes a point in the discussion with clients about who should be an executor, what the job of an executor is and whether and how much they should be paid. More often clients want to start the Will planning dialogue by…

Continue Reading

Allsorts of Potential Problems with Joint Bank Accounts

This blog was written by Ronald Neal, student-at-law at de VRIES LITIGATION LLP. What happens to the money in a joint bank account when one of the joint account owners passes away? Do the funds pass to the surviving joint owner outside of the estate, or do the funds form…

Continue Reading

The Cost of Winning, Sort of….

In my practice, I have been engaged on valuation matters which, on occasion despite the efforts of all those involved, go to trial to have a trial judge settle for the parties. Most trials are expensive and the actual outcome is not always certain, no matter how strong one side…

Continue Reading

The Toronto Maple Leafs and “Pour Over” Clauses have something in Common

With the Toronto Maple Leafs season ending earlier this week, I thought I would take this opportunity to discuss the recent B.C. Supreme Court ruling involving the estate of former Leafs head coach, Pat Quinn (“Pat”). On March 9, 2018, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Funt declared the “pour over” clause…

Continue Reading

More than a Suspicion: The Minimal Evidentiary Threshold

A recent Ontario decision, Martin v. Martin [1], considered the minimal evidentiary threshold required to obtain documentary discovery in a will challenge as set out in Seepa v. Seepa.  For further background on Seepa, read Rebecca Studin’s previous blog post on that decision. In Martin, the Applicant (the named Estate…

Continue Reading

Executors Remuneration

Occasionally, I (like many of fellow bloggers for sure) get asked – what is appropriate remuneration for an executor or executrix to administer an estate – often in circumstances where remuneration is not specified or even referred in the deceased’s will or otherwise. Bottom line, what are the guidelines and…

Continue Reading

Gift of securities by executors of a will

The Canada Revenue Agency provided its views regarding the income tax implications of a gift made by executors of an estate of a deceased individual. The taxpayer died in 2016.  His Will named his three sons as equal beneficiaries and co-executors, with no designation of amounts to be given to…

Continue Reading