All About Estates

Category: Capacity Law

Total 45 Posts

When is a Minor a Major or Super Minor and What Does it Mean?

At law, a child under the age of 18 is considered a party under disability (i.e. a “minor”).  As a result, a minor is treated somewhat differently by the courts.  For example, a minor must be represented by a court appointed litigation guardian in civil court proceedings.  In addition, limitation…

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The Ten D’s of Geriatric Psychiatry

In my consulting work, I have provided independent medical/legal assessments of seniors regarding capacity to sign powers of attorney, capacity to manage property and personal care, capacity to marry, capacity to provide instructions, capacity to provide evidence and both retrospective and contemporaneous assessments of testamentary capacity and capacity to provide…

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QUALIFIED DISABILITY TRUST (“QDT”): HOW TO FILE A JOINT ELECTION?

Recently, the Canada Revenue Agency (“CRA”) issued a “how to file” the joint election for a trust to be a QDT: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pbg/tf/t3qdt/README.html From 2016 forward, this form is to be used if one or more beneficiaries are jointly electing that the trust be designated to be QDT for the year….

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Can a Drunk Clearly Consent?

By now many are familiar with the story reported in the National Post on March 2, 2017 by Ashley Csanady and the subsequent public outrage and calls for appeal in the Nova Scotia acquittal of a case of alleged sexual assault of a young woman intoxicated in the back of…

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The Times Are A Changing and Our Laws & Policies Should Too

Further to my colleague Diane Vieira’s March 15, 2017  blog, in which she summarized the Law Commission of Ontario report on legal capacity, decision-making and guardianship in Ontario, I wanted to highlight some key recommendations that I found to be particularly relevant. Over the last while, I have noticed a…

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LCO Releases Report on Capacity, Decision-making and Guardianship Laws

Last week, the Law Commission of Ontario (“LCO”) released and presented to the provincial government, their final report reviewing Ontario’s statutory framework for legal capacity, decision-making and guardianship matters. The LCO focused on the relevant capacity provisions found in the Health Care Consent Act, the Substitute Decisions Act (“SDA”), and…

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Dementia does not Preclude Testamentary Capacity

Unhappy beneficiaries often challenge the validity of a loved one’s will on the grounds that the testator lacked the capacity to execute a will. Applicants use evidence of the testator’s dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (and other mental disorders) to establish that the testator lacked capacity to execute a will. However,…

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Capacity Issues – who are you going to call?

Capacity to grant and revoke a power of attorney (POA) for property and personal care and incapacity to manage property and personal care is defined by legislation in Ontario by the Substitute Decisions Act. However testamentary capacity (capacity to make a will) is not defined by provincial legislation. Assessors from the…

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POA for Property: A Marriage Sometimes Not Made in Heaven!

In my ALLABOUTESTATES blogs, I have been writing about unanticipated consequences of appointing a power of attorney (POA) for property as per the Ontario Substitute Decisions Act[i] (SDA). Despite the apparent benefits for seniors to have a POA for property, nonetheless unanticipated problems include; Mistaken assumptions by both grantors and…

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Videographers Beware

Occasionally, those hoping to demonstrate the capacity of a testator will film a video of the testator purporting to show that they were cognitively intact or that the will was a reflection of their independent and capable wishes. Unfortunately, the naïve interviewer makes the mistake of confusing the preservation of social graces…

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