All About Estates

Category: Liability

Total 26 Posts

Extended tax payment deadlines and interest relief on tax debt

Further tax payment deadline extensions and interest relief on tax debt are on offer by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) during the COVID-19 pandemic. As announced on July 27, 2020, trusts now have until September 30, 2020, to pay income tax balances and instalments that would have otherwise been due…

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Someone else’s tax bill – Sometimes there is no getting away from it!

In Dreger et al v the Queen (2020 TCC25), the beneficiaries of an estate bequest appealed assessments for unpaid taxes by the deceased. In this case, the deceased was an annuitant of a life income fund (“LIF”) and prior to his death, he designated to each of his daughters as…

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Secret Trusts

Secret and trusts are essentially trust arrangements made between a testator and a trustee, without written disclosure or agreement of the terms of the arrangement, but where an understanding exists between the parties. Based on precedent in case law, the essential elements of a secret trust are: • An intent…

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Costs and the Estate’s Losses

Some losses suffered by the estate due to litigation cannot be recovered.

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Fiduciary Investing Series – How to avoid compounding liability in trust accounts

This blog has been written by Robert Boyd, Director, Scotiatrust. The blog is the first in a series focusing on Fiduciary Investing that will cover a range of practical topics. When one approaches the topic of fiduciary record keeping, there is room for forgiveness for those who tune out (or…

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Trustee’s Personal Liability – It Could Go on for Years!

Take the case of Estate of Ronald Alfred Craymer v Hayward et al, 2019 ONSC 4600, The Craymers were married in the 1980’s. It was a second marriage for Mrs. Craymer and a fourth marriage for Mr. Craymer. At the time of their marriage, Mrs. Craymer had three adult children…

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CRA Keeps A-Knockin’ (and Can Come In)

Estate trustees be warned: you may be held personally liable for failure to pay the estate’s taxes and/or the tax arrears of the deceased. When estate trustees are advised of this fact by their lawyers, pains are taken to soften the blow. CRA tends to be more blunt. Following the…

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Estate Trustees and Costs of Litigation: Try not to take it personally?

In the work I do, I am asked to provide expert testimony to support litigation. In some cases, I am often quite surprised to what extent parties will continue to litigate matters that appear to be “no-wins” or for small dollar amounts. Depending on the circumstances, parties have taken the…

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Death Starts the Clock Ticking on the Limitation Period for Contribution and Indemnity Claims

Conflicting Limitation Periods In Ontario, as in other Canadian jurisdictions, various statutes establish limitation periods within which an injured party can commence a claim against a wrongdoer, including against the estate of a deceased wrongdoer. Under sections 4 and 5 of the Limitations Act, 2002, S.O. 2002, c. 24 ,…

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A Brief Review of Solicitor’s Negligence

Claims against solicitors for negligence often arise in the context of estates cases, whether it be the failure of a lawyer to ensure that a testator’s wishes are accurately reflected in his/her will, to neglecting to confirm the testator had the requisite capacity and was not subject to undue influence…

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