All About Estates


The majority of caregiving is provided by family members who are not paid. In some instances, family members leave their paying job in order to provide care for another family member. I have received several calls asking if I can provide a dollar amount for the care that was provided to a loved one. These calls are received once the care recipient has passed and there is some conflict amongst family members dealing with the estate. If you want to be paid as a family caregiver, then consider a family caregiver agreement. This is a legal contract that details what is to be done, for how long, and the remuneration provided.
A few tips from the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers,include:

-Does the family member have the skills to be doing the caregiver tasks required?

-Does the family member have the level of health him or herself to do these caregiver tasks?

-Include an “escape” clause. The escape clause allows the family caregiver to gracefully bow out of the tasks as they become more challenging or beyond their skills.

-What do you do when the family caregiver gets sick – what is Plan B?

-Consult a lawyer.

-Consider of tax implications.

-Transparency- include the other family members in order to obtain their agreement.

Family caregiving is about more than money and for many, being able to provide care to a love one is priceless. -Audrey Miller

About Audrey Miller
Email: About: Audrey Miller, Managing Director of Elder Caring Inc. has over 25 years social work and rehabilitation experience working with older individuals and their families. She advises the financial, insurance, legal and business communities regarding elder care issues. Audrey is a recognized expert in her field.