All About Estates

Gillian Fournie

Total 20 Posts Website
Gillian is a lawyer with de VRIES LITIGATION LLP. Her practice focuses on the area of trusts and estates litigation. gfournie@devrieslitigation.com

Consolidate, for Efficiency’s Sake!

The 2014 Supreme Court decision, Hryniak v Mauldin, directly addressed the need to increase access to justice. In that case, the Supreme Court clarified and broadened a court’s fact-finding powers on summary judgment motions with the goal of providing litigants a faster procedure in appropriate cases. In the same spirit,…

Continue Reading

Triumph of the Trustee Act

You may be forgiven for thinking that the expression “clear as mud” was created specifically to describe limitation periods. The policy rationale behind limitation periods is to create certainty and predictability by establishing a firm deadline by which a claim must be brought or else the claim is lost forever….

Continue Reading

Friends Helping Friends – Then Forgetting About It

When asking a friend for a financial favour, people often fail to document their actions and decisions as thoroughly as they should – the trust people have in their friends frequently translates into a belief that they do not need to pay attention. Regardless of whether the trust was deserved,…

Continue Reading

Issue Estoppel – Stopping a Second Kick at the Can

The discovery of holographic wills always send up red flags to estates litigators, especially when the holographic will is a dramatic departure from the prior distribution of the estate. While questions of fraud immediately come to mind, there may also be a limitations problem if the holographic will is found…

Continue Reading

Medical Emergency Cards – A Logical Follow-up to POAPCs

As regular readers know, we occasionally invite guest bloggers to contribute to All About Estates  Today’s blog was written by Norman Bowley, a partner and chair of the Estates and Succession Group at Low Murchison Radnoff LLP . In my wallet you will find a plastic card the size of a credit…

Continue Reading

The OPGT and the Case of the Missing Estate Trustee

As regular readers of this blog well know, not everyone dies with a will. When this happens, the Succession Law Reform Act (Part II) sets out who are the beneficiaries of the estate, while the Estates Act (section 29) ranks in order of priority who may apply to be estate…

Continue Reading

Don’t Look a Gift House in the Mouth

“A resulting trust arises when title to property is in one party’s name, but that party, because he or she is a fiduciary or gave no value for the property, is under an obligation to return it to the original title owner.” Pecore v Pecore (SCC). In 1969, Luisa immigrated…

Continue Reading

When Business Agreements Masquerade as Trusts

Trusts are tricky – they can arise in circumstances where none of the parties involved ever use the word “trust.” There is good reason for this; often the settlor of the trust and the trustee are laypeople who can describe the type of relationship they wish to create, but are…

Continue Reading

Motion to Approve Settlement – A Fine Balance

Rule 7.08 of the Rules of Civil Procedure states that no settlement of a claim involving a person under disability is binding on that person unless the settlement is approved by a judge. Why court approval of settlements is necessary is succinctly summarized in Wu Estate v Zurich Insurance Co.: “The purpose…

Continue Reading

Application For Directions – Breaking The Impasse

Impasses between co-trustees, which are not uncommon, have serious results. They can lead to a standstill in the administration of a trust or estate, to the detriment of the beneficiaries. In those circumstances, the court may decide the issue and direct the trustees on how to move forward. Such was the case in Squillace v Sampogna.

Continue Reading